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The Look: Le Smoking

LS-thelookthumbNo, we’re not focusing on that bad nicotine habit, but on ‘le smoking’, French for tuxedo, and one of Yves Saint Laurent’s most enduring creations. Derived from the English “smoking suit”, it was originally a term for menswear. That changed in 1966, when the French designer awed the fashion world with the femme fatale version. His legendary design redefined the female silhouette and created a new wardrobe staple for generations to come.

 

By Flavia Aroesty

 

No, we’re not focusing on that bad nicotine habit, but on ‘le smoking’, French for tuxedo, and one of Yves Saint Laurent’s most enduring creations. Derived from the English “smoking suit”, it was originally a term for menswear. That changed in 1966, when the French designer awed the fashion world with the femme fatale version. His legendary design redefined the female silhouette and created a new wardrobe staple for generations to come.


Take a cue from Kate Moss and pair it casually with skinny jeans and flats for an everyday look, or go full glam for an evening out and enjoy all the power of wearing pants and still looking chic.

 

LS-TheLook

 


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