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Meet the Cub Scouts

Rye Cub Scout Pack 2 will host an Informational Open House Monday, September 18 from 6-9 at Rye Recreation. Interested parents of boys in grades 1-5 are invited to stop by to learn more about scouting.  

The first monthly Pack meeting of the year will be held Wednesday, September 20 at 7 at Rye Presbyterian Church. Further information is available at www.ryepack2.com or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

By Caitlin Brown

 

 

For lovers of small plates, handcrafted cocktails, and wood-fired sides, Village Social Kitchen is the dining destination in downtown Rye. 

 

The vibe is low-key but hip, and there is a bustling crowd, both at the bar, which serves a full menu (and has two large TVs for sports lovers wanting to catch a game), and in the main dining room, which includes outdoor seating for those wanting to enjoy al fresco dining and people watching. 

 

Owner Joe Bueti’s vision was to recreate a city gastropub with contemporary comfort food and a neighborhood feel. Mogan Anthony, who worked at various Jean Georges establishments before becoming executive chef of Bueti’s restaurant group, describes the menu as veggie-centric and Japanese-inspired. And in a few short months, Chef Alex Aparicio, formerly of Dove Tail, Avant Garden, and Bobby Flay, has attracted a big following.  

 

We had a hard time choosing among the starters, so we asked our waiter for his recommendations. We shared the popular Avocado Toast (the combination of creamy burrata, avocado, and pea pesto is divine) and the sinfully good Bacon Dumplings. The Social Wings, with Vietnamese lime glaze, are a heavenly alternative to the standard Buffalo Wings bar fare. We couldn’t resist trying the Salty Pretzel Tuna, as it sounded, well, different. It made out taste buds sing with its juxtaposition of cool and hot, spicy and delicate, and lots of crunch.

 

For those who can’t get enough organic vegetables, try the Roasted Beets with grapefruit, sunflower seeds, and horseradish yogurt, or the Mother’s Grain Salad of arugula, wheat berries, quinoa, cucumber, hazelnuts, and more tossed with yogurt vinaigrette.

 

The Wood-Fired Corn on the Cob and the Crispy Artichokes bring new meaning to Sides and Vegetables.

 

For the main course, Village Social offers a range of fish, pasta, meat, and poultry dishes. Try the Seafood Fettucini with Calabrian chili, Izakaya Tuna with a tamarind glaze and served with ginger rice, Charred Skirt Steak, or Grilled Berkshire Pork Chop. 

 

If you’re bringing the kids, they’ll be thrilled with a Kobe Beef Hot Dog, Short Rib Grilled Cheese, or the Dare Devil Pizza.

 

In addition to a small but fine wine selection, they mix up handcrafted cocktails with names like No Brainer (gin, cucumber, mint) and Manhattan on Tap.  

 

One of the best things about Village Social, aside from its culinary creations, reasonable prices, and topnotch service, is that they installed soundproofing. It’s one of the few popular restaurants where you can carry on a conversation with your dinner partner.

 

Village Social, located at 67 Purchase Street, is open for lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. To make a reservation, call 612-4267. 

 

 

Photos by Pedro Garcia

 

 

By Georgetta L. Morque

Faudia Silletta has been putting the finishing touches on the newly opened Laser & SkinCare MedSpa of Westchester at B Spa Salon, just south of City Hall at 1031 Boston Post Road. As the MedSpa founder and new owner of B Spa Salon, she’s excited to bring a wealth of services to the Rye community. The facility offers a wide range of beauty treatments, from hair color and styling downstairs to skin rejuvenation and more upstairs.

In the tranquil retreat upstairs, comfortable private rooms are available for massage, facials, laser hair removal, and advanced skincare treatments. The Candela GentleMax Pro Laser features the latest technologies to remove unwanted hair and is appropriate for all skin types. With its different settings, the laser is also used to treat spider veins, uneven skin texture, age spots, and toenail fungus, and it is also effective for skin tightening. Manicures and pedicures are offered for both men and women.

A native of Guyana, Silletta emigrated to the U.S. at age 17 to continue her studies in chemistry and biology at the State University of New York and New York University. With a background in science and medicine, Silletta has worked for private medical practices and hospitals, including Cornell University Hospital where she served as a research chemist.

Silletta has also walked the runway numerous times at New York’s Fashion Week. Last year, she was crowned Mrs. New York International, winning the pageant that promotes the accomplishments of married women and their commitment to family. Her platforms were autism, breast cancer, childhood cancer, and children’s homelessness, causes she is passionate about helping. Committed to giving back, she continues to volunteer for a variety of organizations. “It’s part of who I am,” she explained.

Her personal interest in fashion and beauty, combined with her science and medical knowledge, led her to the field of aesthetic skincare. She became certified in laser medicine and chose Rye and Scarsdale for her first business ventures. Rye appealed to her because of its shops and restaurants, and quiet character as opposed to New York City’s fast pace. Proximity to her home in Eastchester was also important. She really loves what she does but she is the mother of two young sons, too.

For a complimentary consultation, contact Faudia Silletta at 347-931-4436.

By Caitlin Brown

For lovers of small plates, handcrafted cocktails, and wood-fired sides, Village Social Kitchen is the dining destination in downtown Rye.

The vibe is low-key but hip, and there is a bustling crowd, both at the bar, which serves a full menu (and has two large TVs for sports lovers wanting to catch a game), and in the main dining room, which includes outdoor seating for those wanting to enjoy al fresco dining and people watching.

Owner Joe Bueti’s vision was to recreate a city gastropub with contemporary comfort food and a neighborhood feel. Mogan Anthony, who worked at various Jean Georges establishments before becoming executive chef of Bueti’s restaurant group, describes the menu as veggie-centric and Japanese-inspired. And in a few short months, Chef Alex Aparicio, formerly of Dove Tail, Avant Garden, and Bobby Flay, has attracted a big following.

We had a hard time choosing among the starters, so we asked our waiter for his recommendations. We shared the popular Avocado Toast (the combination of creamy burrata, avocado, and pea pesto is divine) and the sinfully good Bacon Dumplings. The Social Wings, with Vietnamese lime glaze, are a heavenly alternative to the standard Buffalo Wings bar fare. We couldn’t resist trying the Salty Pretzel Tuna, as it sounded, well, different. It made out taste buds sing with its juxtaposition of cool and hot, spicy and delicate, and lots of crunch.

For those who can’t get enough organic vegetables, try the Roasted Beets with grapefruit, sunflower seeds, and horseradish yogurt, or the Mother’s Grain Salad of arugula, wheat berries, quinoa, cucumber, hazelnuts, and more tossed with yogurt vinaigrette.

The Wood-Fired Corn on the Cob and the Crispy Artichokes bring new meaning to Sides and Vegetables.

For the main course, Village Social offers a range of fish, pasta, meat, and poultry dishes. Try the Seafood Fettucini with Calabrian chili, Izakaya Tuna with a tamarind glaze and served with ginger rice, Charred Skirt Steak, or Grilled Berkshire Pork Chop.

If you’re bringing the kids, they’ll be thrilled with a Kobe Beef Hot Dog, Short Rib Grilled Cheese, or the Dare Devil Pizza.

In addition to a small but fine wine selection, they mix up handcrafted cocktails with names like No Brainer (gin, cucumber, mint) and Manhattan on Tap.

One of the best things about Village Social, aside from its culinary creations, reasonable prices, and topnotch service, is that they installed soundproofing. It’s one of the few popular restaurants where you can carry on a conversation with your dinner partner.

Village Social, located at 67 Purchase Street, is open for lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. To make a reservation, call 612-4267.

Photos by Pedro Garcia

By Bill Lawyer

In recent months people involved with improving Rye’s resilience to serious storms have expressed concern that the Rye Rising projects that were initiated are “going nowhere.” Further, the City may lose funds that were awarded by New York State due to failure to meet deadlines spelled out in the contract, which expires in 2019.

But before looking at recent developments, some background information is needed to help understand what’s at stake.

It’s been ten years since two serious floods took place in 2007. Then along came Hurricane Irene in 2011 and Sandy in 2012. Following each of these disasters people looked to government to help — not only with cleanup, repair, and restoration, but also with designing structures and infrastructures that were more resilient — for the inevitable storms that would arrive in the years to come.

Committees were formed and inter-municipal studies, watershed-wide in scope, were begun. Rye was greatly impacted by the rainfall in the upper Blind Brook watershed, where the amount of impervious surfaces has greatly increased in recent years, due mainly to the construction of new homes, office buildings, and roadways.

But Rye wasn’t the only Westchester community to seek help with the serious damage from the rising tides and inundated streams and rivers.

After the 2007 storms, Westchester County developed a special fund for municipalities that had viable projects for diminishing the impact of storms.

Fortunately, Rye had been involved with the Long Island Sound Watershed Intermunicipal Council (LISWIC) for many years and was ready to move forward.

Rye was one of the first to be awarded funds, which were used to restore the sluicegate at the Bowman Avenue Dam on Blind Brook.

A committee of residents, many of whom lived in and adjacent to Indian Village, was established to assist the Rye City Council in identifying and prioritizing improvement projects.

Over the years, Rye has participated in several projects to stop damage caused by storm-water runoff. These include planting trees and shrubs and expanding wetlands to retain rainfall, and the installation of dry well equipment.

After Irene and Sandy, New York State developed a new program for resiliency improvements, New York Rising, and the City of Rye submitted a proposal.

 

The Rye City Lions Club invites nominations of deserving individuals to receive the James A. and Marian M. Shea Community Service Award. Established in 2003, the Award recognizes an individual who lives or works in Rye and has contributed to improving the lives of its citizens by volunteering services of an outstanding nature.

Nomination forms may be obtained via the Club’s website, www.e-clubhouse.org/sites/ryecityny. Mail completed forms by September 22 to the Rye City Lions Club, P.O. Box 354, Rye, NY 10580. The award will be presented at the Club’s annual Charter Dinner on November 17 at Apawamis Club.